понедельник, 25 апреля 2011 г.

Прогулка по блоггам 2


  1. 1
    Step 1
    Cut 2 lengths of the sequin trim, about 6" long each.

  2. 2
    Step 2
    Hand-stitch the long edges together to make a single piece 2" wide by 6" long, overlapping the sequins as you go to camouflage where the pieces are sewn together.

  3. 3
    Step 3
    Fold the short ends of the 6" piece together to make a loop. Hand-sew the ends together.

  4. 4
    Step 4
    Place a rubber band around the center of this loop to create a bow shape. (I had to loop it twice over to make it tight enough.)

  5. 5
    Step 5
    Cut a short piece of the trim about 3-4" long.

  6. 6
    Step 6
    Wrap this piece around the rubber-band to disguise it, and hand-stitch the ends together at the back of your bow. (I also folded the long edges of the short piece towards the center because I liked the proportions better.)

  7. 7
    Step 7
    Hand-stitch the bow onto the center of your remaining trim.

  8. 8
    Step 8
    Try on the belt to make sure the trim doesn't go all the way around your waist, even when stretched. (We need it to be shorter so the elastic can be the closure area at the back.) Cut the ends of the sequin trim to shorten it if necessary. Fold the end of the trim under itself, place on top of the end of the elastic, and hand-stitch down. (Tip: Heat-sealing the edges of the elastic once you cut them with an open flame will prevent fraying.)

  9. 9
    Step 9
    Do the same to the other end of the trim and the other end of the elastic piece.

  10. 10
    Step 10
    Cut the elastic piece in the center, and try on the belt.

  11. 11
    Step 11
    Fold the elastic under itself at the point where it overlaps about 1/2 - 1" at your back. Trim the elastic with about 1" extra, heat-seal the edges, and fold under.

  12. 12
    Step 12
    Stitch down.

  13. 13
    Step 13
    Create the closure for the back: I chose to use heavy-duty snaps, but if you don't have a snap-setter you can use sew-on snaps, or a piece of velcro instead.

  14. 14
    Step 14
    If you're using the heavy-duty snaps, make holes for the snaps with an awl, small scissors, or hole punch, and set the snaps according to their directions.

    Instructions 
    1. 1
      Step 1
      Gather your supplies :)

    2. 2
      Step 2
      Draw your music notes. I should have done this not on the back of the vinyl because it needs to be reversed. Or you could print it and flip the image online if you want to be fancy about it.

    3. 3
      Step 3
      This is better. The reverse image that will be the right way around when I cut.

    4. 4
      Step 4
      Cut it out with scissors.

    5. 5
      Step 5
      Make your pouch. (See my other projects for a tutorial - if needed)

    6. 6
      Step 6
      Glue your notes on. You could sew this down, but you should do that before making the pouch if you want to sew. I just decided to glue because it would be quicker and I could center it afterwards.

    7. 7
      Step 7
      Done!

    8. 8
      Step 8
      Get glammed up and use your new clutch!

      IN HERE

      - The DIYs made a triumphant return! Perhaps you’ll try to make a neon wrap bracelet or a colorblock pendant this holiday weekend?
      -  Still more time? Check out these creative ideas.
      HAPPY EASTER!
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      DIY Colorblock Necklace


      The last project I made with polymer clay was the geometric pendant necklace and I was so happy to see how many people enjoyed it and tried to make their own. I don’t find too many DIYs being made with polymer clay – it’s usually crafty-crafts like floral beads and figurines that aren’t my style – so it was extra exciting to see people giving PC a try for the first time. It’s such an inexpensive and versatile craft supply!

      I was inspired by the design of this Minoux necklace featured on Oh Joy last week. It’s made from brass, enamel and sterling silver which aren’t the simplest materials to work with so I decided to make my own take on the design using clay that I had on-hand.

      Here’s the clay (a color I think of as Seuss blue, a faux stone that looks just like cookies & cream ,and pearl) I used along with my clay knife and $0.20 hardware store tile that I use as a work surface and for baking the clay. Condition the clay and then press it out into a flat, even pancake on the tile. Use your knife (or razor blade) to slice of the edges into the shapes for your pendant. (Chevrons would be awesome, but rectangles are simplest.)

      Poke holes in each of the clay pieces. I used an eye pin, but you could also use a wood skewer, bead reamer or any other thin, pointy object. Then bake according to the clay directions – my pieces were about 1/4″ thick so they took 30 minutes at 275F.

      To finish, assemble the pieces and attach to the chain. I used 6 eye pins (for the top three pieces) and 2 head pins (for the bottom pieces. I simply inserted them through the holes I’d made and used round nose pliers to make a simple loop to attach them together. If you don’t have any experience with jewelry making but you are interested I would really encourage you to begin by learning basic wire-wrapping. It’s a pretty simple technique that can be used in infinite ways. Check out the link above for some videos, or if you are near Houston check my upcoming class schedule.
      And finally, here’s what the necklace looks like when you are wearing it (if you look like my dining room table).

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      Девочки и мальчики у меня печаль.... Нашла обалденный сайт а там нельзя копировать!!! вот на него ссылка 
      http://theseams.blogspot.com/search/label/DIY
      НЕ ПРОХОДИТЕ МИМО!!!!!!

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